Mark Pellegrino of 'Being Human' gets 'Lost' in gods, monsters
Mark Pellegrino as Bishop from "Being Human."
February 23rd, 2012
04:16 PM ET

Mark Pellegrino of 'Being Human' gets 'Lost' in gods, monsters

Editor's note: Aaron Sagers is a New York-based entertainment writer and nationally syndicated pop-culture columnist. He has specialty knowledge in "paranormal pop culture," has lectured at conventions across the country on the topic and is a media pundit on supernatural entertainment. He covers pop culture daily at ParanormalPopCulture.com and can be found on Twitter @aaronsagers.

Spoiler alert: Here there be spoilers. If you choose to read ahead, you might learn a few things about "Being Human."

If the apocalypse does occur in 2012, it’s a safe bet that Mark Pellegrino is somehow involved.

As an actor, he has played multiple roles so significantly tied to the survival or obliteration of humanity one can’t help but wonder if his agent is reading the Book of Revelation in between scripts – or if Pellegrino might actually perform on a stage at the end of the world.

Pellegrino is not a god, but he has played a few memorable ones on TV. He is respected for notable roles like Rita’s wife-beating ex Paul on "Dexter"; Gavin Q. Baker, a flamboyant attorney to cops on "The Closer", a character worthy of his own spinoff; Tom Dempsey, an old-school mobster on "Castle". But the actor is better known as Jacob, the godlike protector of the Island on mythology-heavy "Lost."

Other viewers know him better as Lucifer, the fallen archangel-cum-devil on another mythology-heavy show, "Supernatural" – a role he just returned to on the February 17 episode "Repo Man" as a vision to Sam Winchester.

Still others might know Pellegrino best as Bishop, the undead (and later very dead) leader of Boston vampires on Syfy’s reboot series "Being Human". In "Being Human," which airs Mondays at 9 p.m., Bishop is yet another character in Pellegrino’s rogues gallery with a god complex. Bishop has designs on wiping out much of the human race, and turning the remainder into slaves.

And because death can’t keep a good bad guy down, Bishop returns in tonight’s episode of Being Human to torment his vampire son Aidan (Sam Witwer), who is experiencing a bit of parenting problems himself

Mark Pellegrino joined us over the phone to discuss Bishop’s return, his career as angels and demons, and even his love of video games, zombies and a possible role on The Walking Dead. FULL POST

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Zombie apocalypse preparedness
Do you have a plan for when zombies attack?
February 23rd, 2012
02:26 PM ET

Zombie apocalypse preparedness

Editor's note: Aaron Sagers is a New York-based entertainment writer and nationally syndicated pop-culture columnist. He has specialty knowledge in "paranormal pop culture," has lectured at conventions across the country on the topic and is a media pundit on supernatural entertainment. He covers pop culture daily at ParanormalPopCulture.com and can be found on Twitter @aaronsagers.

Look at you, all plump and fleshy, with a quickening pulse and body jam-packed with sweet meats. That brain of yours, with the scrumptious gray matter and thinking cap makes certain re-animated corpses crave a dining bib.

So what are you to do when the formerly living awaken with a hunger for a little human takeout? Are you ready for the zombie apocalypse?

Probably not. If you have to ask yourself that question, or took a moment before answering, then definitely not. In the time it took you to hesitate, even the slowest zombie could pull a dine and dash – or shamble – on you.

On the upside, you’re in luck since most people haven’t made the adequate preparations for Z-day.

Here’s the deal: A zombie can be a member of the walking dead or a barely living victim from a curse, virus, etc., and alternately run or shamble. They can be the creation of stupid humans, angry gods, black magic, mad science, cosmic events or – as is most often the case – comic book/sci-fi/horror nerds. But whatever their origin, they are a problem that must be dealt with. FULL POST

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How to speak Apocalypse: A terminology primer
It's 2012. Do you know your apocalypse terms?
January 12th, 2012
01:15 PM ET

How to speak Apocalypse: A terminology primer

Editor's note: Aaron Sagers is a New York-based entertainment writer and nationally syndicated pop-culture columnist. He has specialty knowledge in "paranormal pop culture," has lectured at conventions across the country on the topic and is a media pundit on supernatural entertainment. He covers pop culture daily at ParanormalPopCulture.com and can be found on Twitter @aaronsagers.

It’s the end of the world as we know it, and I feel confused.

Instead of a lone doomsday-sayer on a city street corner with a sandwich board, the news media and popular culture have taken to talking about the end being nigh. Especially with the 2012 Mayan calendar predictions, the big one has become big business. But not all end-of-days scenarios are equal within the world of dedicated apocalypse nerds.

There are multiple theories that go beyond the zombocalypse or rise of the machines, and even the words themselves that are used to describe humanity’s last hurrah have different meanings, depending on the groups that use them.

To understand the nuances of the language of the end times, we compiled the following key phrases from the nerd set as a glossary to go out on, along with the help of John R. Hall, a professor of sociology at the University of California, Davis, and author of “Apocalypse: From Antiquity to the Empire of Modernity.”

FULL POST

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Formative gifts of geek celebrities
Every once in a while, a holiday present manages to make it OK that you're a nerd.
December 19th, 2011
06:05 PM ET

Formative gifts of geek celebrities

Editor's note: Aaron Sagers is a New York-based entertainment writer and nationally syndicated pop-culture columnist. He has specialty knowledge in 'paranormal pop culture,' has lectured at conventions across the country on the topic and is a media pundit on supernatural entertainment. He covers pop culture daily at paranormalpopculture.com and can be found on Twitter @aaronsagers.

For an emerging nerd, the holidays can be a formative time of year. In the yuletide, when gift-giving is at its peak,  family members and friends see us for the geek that we are, the geek we will become, and embrace us for it.

Even in this day and age, when geek is chic and images of nerds are all over pop culture, that kind of honest acceptance is rare. When loved ones give us gifts that speak to our true nature without attempting to judge or change us, it leaves a lasting impact.

In that spirit, CNN's Geek Out! reached out to a few famous nerds to share their fondest geeky gift memories – and to also share how becoming accomplished members of the nerd herd has affected the kinds of goodies they now receive. FULL POST

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Putting the 'con' back in Santacon
BatSanta and his trusted side-Santa, Robin.
December 13th, 2011
12:49 PM ET

Putting the 'con' back in Santacon

Editor's note: Aaron Sagers is a New York-based entertainment writer and nationally syndicated pop-culture columnist. He has specialty knowledge in 'paranormal pop culture,' has lectured at conventions across the country on the topic and is a media pundit on supernatural entertainment. He covers pop culture daily at paranormalpopculture.com and can be found on Twitter @aaronsagers.

Santacon may have started off using “con” ironically, but at this counter culture, mischief-making costume party the nerds are making themselves known.

The San Francisco Chronicle reported the tradition – initially dubbed “Santarchy” – began in San Francisco in 1994 by The Suicide Club, “a collection of people dedicated to urban adventure and pranks.” When the Suicide Club disbanded, former members formed the Cacophony Society, a San Francisco anarchic performance art group which carried on the Santa antics.

Since then, cities across the world have launched their own variation of the event. Santacon NYC seems to be the best-organized of the gatherings – or as organized as an event can be that is “non-denominational, non-commercial, non-political and non-sensical” and “occurs once a year for absolutely no reason,” according to the event's website. The Santacon mob roams the city supporting charities, spreading cheer, singing naughty carols, consuming copious amounts of holiday spirits and even visiting one strip club.

It is impossible to ignore the irony present in an event initially started to stir up the mainstream by causing mischief – all the while subverting the character of Santa. The origin story of Santacon is just the sort of performance mob art hipsters and hippies alike dig into. This is not the description of a nerdy event.

And yet, at 10 a.m. last Saturday at Manhattan’s North Cove Marina, among the thousands of people dressed as Santa Clauses, elves, reindeer, Jesuses and more, were Santa Neo from “The Matrix,” Incredible Hulk Grinch, a trio of Run-D.M.C. Santas, S.W.A.T. elves, Santa Batman, Victorian Father Christmas, Kurt Cobain Claus, and more sexy variations of holiday tropes than one could shake a candy cane at.

Have the nerds and superfans crashed Santacon? Yes and no. FULL POST

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