Beloved bounty hunter Boba Fett is dead - but who killed him?
Bounty hunter Boba Fett is killed in the new Dark Horse comic “Star Wars Blood Ties: Boba Fett is Dead" #1.
April 24th, 2012
06:05 PM ET

Beloved bounty hunter Boba Fett is dead - but who killed him?

Hello again, fellow comic readers!

The pick this week sees a Star Wars fan-favorite killed on the first page - Dark Horse Comics’ “Star Wars Blood Ties: Boba Fett is Dead #1".

The rest of the book answers the question “Who would want to kill Boba Fett?” Pretty much everyone, it turns out. As the preeminent bounty hunter of the Star Wars universe, Fett's list of enemies is about as long as a Hoth winter. But there’s another mystery at the core of the book: Who would want to kill the men who killed Boba Fett?

Boba Fett first showed up as an animated short in the notorious “Star Wars Holiday Special” and quickly became a beloved character. He’s the enigmatic bounty hunter shrewd enough to outfox Han Solo in “The Empire Strikes Back,” then responsible for transporting Solo after he was frozen in carbonite.

Friend of Geek Out and all-around comic guy Daniel Dean from Titan Games and Comics in Smyrna, Georgia, put it best when he said his favorite comics are the ones where a character who isn’t the focus of the story still drives the story.

“Sometimes the best place to begin is with an ending,” Dean said. “Boba Fett's dead; now what?”

We got a chance to talk to Tom Taylor, who wrote the script for “Boba Fett is Dead” #1.

He’s a husband, father of two, screenwriter, playwright, creator of the all-ages graphic novel “The Deep: Here Be Dragons” and writer of the “Star Wars: Invasion” series, “Star Wars: Blood Ties”, “Star Wars Adventures” and the upcoming “Darth Maul: Death Sentence.” FULL POST

Fan raises funds to make 'Static Shock' film
Stefan Dezil stars as Static in his short film, "Static Shock Blackout."
April 24th, 2012
11:39 AM ET

Fan raises funds to make 'Static Shock' film

Static has enjoyed a good amount of success for a superhero since the DC Comics character was introduced in 1993.

The comic book series "Static Shock," became a Saturday morning cartoon series, which lasted for four seasons starting in 2000. It was also part of DC's "New 52" titles, introduced last August, although the series is ending after eight issues this month. (DC Comics is owned by Time Warner, the owner of CNN.)

One medium the character has yet to crack, however, is the big screen, and Stefan Dezil hopes to change all that.

Dezil raised the money to shoot a 13-minute short film about the character, and - like "Archetype," a science fiction success story - he hopes the film will show a feature-length film could work. The result is "Static Shock Blackout."

Dezil spoke to CNN Geek Out about the project.
FULL POST

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Geekiness and autism: Is there a connection?
Laura Nagle, 58, loves science but has struggled with communication all her life.
April 23rd, 2012
02:58 PM ET

Geekiness and autism: Is there a connection?

Laura Nagle loves physics. She peruses scientific papers for her own enjoyment, and she can sometimes work out the answers to cosmological mysteries in her head when she watches documentaries about the universe. She has read, in her estimation, about 12,000 books.

You might say Nagle, 58, is a geek. But if you knew that she also has had severe problems communicating with others throughout her life, and had trouble in school because she’s not “well-rounded,” you might guess that she also has autism.

“I find that physics, engineering – these things speak to my heart, and I see details, relationships and patterns that most people don’t,” says Nagle, who lives near Flagstaff, Arizona.

FULL POST

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Students chow down on cyber security weaknesses
Hungry Hungry Hackers at Georgia Tech gives students hands-on cyber security training.
April 23rd, 2012
02:22 PM ET

Students chow down on cyber security weaknesses

A group of hackers gathering under one roof might not sound like such a good thing, but they’re far from what you would call cyber crooks.

They call themselves the Hungry Hungry Hackers, or H3, and they aren’t hungry for marbles or breaching others' personal information. They’re students hungry to learn to protect digital assets and information systems. They seek weak points in a network built for them on Georgia Tech's Atlanta campus, then try to strengthen them - it'  a safe, ethical space for students to test their skills in cyber-security.

CNN Geek Out spoke to Toni Walden and Joshua L. Davis from Hungry Hungry Hackers about hacking culture, H3 and their Hungry Hungry Hackers Campus Challenge, known as H3C2, which unfolded earlier this month. This is an edited transcript of the conversation.

CNN Geek Out: So what is Hungry Hungry Hackers all about and how did it start?

Walden: It seemed like students really wanted to learn more about information security. So a bunch of us together at (the Georgia Tech Research Institute), and with some help from (the Georgia Tech Information Security Center),  Georgia Tech Association for Computing Machinery and Georgia Tech Gray Hat, came together to create a series of different challenges for students to engage in. H3 is about creating a hacking platform where students can learn and grow their skill in a fun and safe way, and it’s about sharing that common interest we have when it comes to information security.

We think school provides a really good theoretical understanding of problems one might see in the field, but what lacks is a hands-on perspective. We just want to offer students with ethical and fun experiences.

FULL POST

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Why the U.S. might never catch on to the next big rhythm games
Nintendo's "Rhythm Heaven Fever" was released in the United States, but many popular Japanese rhythm games aren't.
April 20th, 2012
03:29 PM ET

Why the U.S. might never catch on to the next big rhythm games

This week, a Japanese game company announced it is making "AKB48+Me," which features the enormously big-in-Japan all-girl pop group AKB48, and gives the player a chance to rock out right alongside them - as a member.

It's meltdown-worthy for fans of J-pop, but "idol simulation" is just the latest in the long line of games that bring together music and motion - and never made it to the United States.

It's not unusual to find plastic guitars and drums in American living rooms these days. "Rock Band" is massively popular with gamers and nongamers alike, and Nintendo of America recently made a move to localize several entries in its "Rhythm Heaven" series, which has been a beloved franchise in Japan for years. But so far, its 2 million in sales doesn't quite compare to the 75 million in Japan.

American gamers have gotten pretty good at jamming Metallica and Van Halen, but when a Japanese gamer goes into the zone while playing an arcade rhythm game, there are flying hands and speeds that seem beyond human capability.

The truth is that rhythm games were born in Japan, and evolved a bit differently in the United States.

FULL POST

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