Homage to ‘The Venture Bros.’ gets appropriately warped
August 30th, 2011
10:18 PM ET

Homage to ‘The Venture Bros.’ gets appropriately warped

In the realm of cosplay, few American cartoons enjoy the level of success that The Venture Bros. does.

“The Venture Bros. has a strong cult following. It's a real geeky cartoon with a lot of comic book and sci-fi references,” saidMarc Ilagan, founder of VentureBrosBlog.org.

"Other TV shows like 'Family Guy' are just not as popular among cosplayers," he said.

'"It's nothing against the show, it's just difficult to pull off a character in plain clothing versus an actual fantasy costume. At Dragon*Con, I've seen costumes from shows like 'Metalocalypse', 'Superjail' and 'Harvey Birdman' but not as many as the Venture Brothers. I think the Venture Bros. remains a popular show to cosplay because the characters are fun and costumes relatively easy to make."

Dragon*Con, an annual sci-fi fantasy convention in Atlanta, Georgia, is is like a giant costume party, Ilagan said, and "Venture Bros." fans take pride in showing off their costume making skills there. FULL POST

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Americans to anime: 'You've changed'
August 30th, 2011
05:31 PM ET

Americans to anime: 'You've changed'

When the wave of Japanese animation first hit American shores, it started in small ways.

It wasn’t shown in movie theatres. Friends gave tapes and laser disks to their other friends. Neighborhood Blockbusters quietly built new, narrow shelves, conspicuous against the endless, over-polished stream of new releases. Those shelves bore a tiny nameplate, with a single new word.

Anime.

The vivid art on the covers of the VHS cassettes of the early 1990s captured American attention, even though there were few to choose from. The anime titles available to stateside consumers at video stores had dark themes: “Akira,” featured a cyberpunk/sci-fi flavored plot about a biker gang that discovers a secret that led to the destruction of Tokyo. “Vampire Hunter D,” combines several pulp genres to tell the tale of a vampire hunter who is half vampire himself. “Battle Angel,” followed a female cyborg that falls in love with a human boy who has a burning desire to reach a paradise in the sky.

These films were not new in their native country of Japan - some dated back from the mid-nineteen eighties. But as American viewers consumed this media, a community of Japanophiles began to take shape. FULL POST

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Filed under: Otaku